Miso Roasted Cauliflower

Cauliflower.

It’s kind of having a moment.

It’s in pizza crusts. It’s getting riced.

Cauliflower should send Keto a big basket of Thank You! for all the attention it’s getting right now.

I am not a big cauliflower eater.

It’s not even the crudité I select to dip into ranch sauce when I’m tailgating. I’m more of a carrots gal for that.

But this recipe. THIS RECIPE! It has me enjoying cauliflower for the first time ever. And I want to share that joy with you.

Also, regular ‘ole peanuts…get transformed when they are baked in this recipe.

Two things. TWO. That I categorically Do Not Like are beyond delicious in this recipe.

Here’s what you’ll need:

Ingredients

  • Cauliflower (medium to small sized – 2 lbs-ish)
  • Tahini (a big glop, use a serving spoon to measure)
  • Miso (an oversized spoonful, normal soup spoon that mimics the Eiffel Tower with miso)
  • Cocktail onions (15, halve them)
  • Peanuts (a handful, more if you really like peanuts)
  • Scallions (one bunch)
  • Cilantro (optional)

Mix everything in a bowl.

Cook at 400 degrees. Turn the veggies after 20 minutes and let bake for an additional 20 minutes.

Plate and serve!

miso roasted cauliflower

You’ll notice that the ingredients listed above aren’t very precise. There is a reason for that. All amounts are suggestions. If you really dig cocktail onions, use more. Can’t get enough scallions? Send in more scallions!

Part of the joy of cooking is that it’s hard to mess up a good recipe. What do I mean? If you don’t like the ingredients, chances are you won’t like the dish. If you like the way a dish tastes, tweaking the amount of ingredients you use should only amplify what you like.

This aforementioned fact, by the way, has taken me months of cooking to realize. Hopefully I’m saving you, my good reader, some amount of anguish by sharing this knowledge with you today.

While eating my miso roasted cauliflower I asked myself, what’s risky about cooking? When you’ve spent most of your childhood and adult life not paying attention to what’s in your foods – spices, vegetables, meats…it makes picking a good recipe HARD. A good recipe, in my opinion, is one where the dish tastes AMAZING to you.

What this means is, the risks of cooking for me come down more heavily on picking the right ingredients for my tastebuds and less in the execution. Reasons why a dish doesn’t work out: spoiled ingredients, over-cooking/under-cooking, etc. aside, I wouldn’t get too bent out of shape about how many ounces or sprinkles and dashes you’re using in any recipe (I can hear the bakers groaning in the back. I hear you. And now is not your time.).

Now go make some miso roasted cauliflower. I wish you the best of success in your kitchen experiments!